Tag Archives: food

My Lollipop

-This lollipop tastes funny.
That’s nice dear. What lollipop?

-This one.
But I didn’t give you a…

-I found it.
Where?

-Here.
Where is here?

-If you look at me, you’d see.
You got it from the floor?

-Yes.
Why?

-I was hungry.
If you’re hungry, then you ask mummy or daddy for something.

-I did. But then I found a lollipop.
I don’t think you did.

-But it’s on a stick?
It is. But I don’t think it’s a lollipop, Sweetie.

-What is it then?
That’s a good question. Could you give it to mummy?

-No. It’s my lollipop.


This piece was submitted as part of Friday Fictioneers, hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. 1 photograph. 100 words. Often with over 100 people taking part.

unidentifiable-on-a-stick

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Chow Mein for Jermaine

Jermaine had been away from Swindon for a while. He couldn’t remember precisely when he left, but he knew it had been sometime in May.

He’d had a hankering, one Wednesday night, for Chinese food and set off in search of the perfect Chow Mein. He had begun by visiting the local take-aways but soon realised that none of them were up to snuff. A train ride to London soon followed and Jermaine sampled as many noodles as he could in a fortnight.

As he said “so long,” to Soho, Jermaine ventured east until finally (several months later) he stepped off a cargo vessel that had come to rest in Shanghai. Jermaine stayed until he’d tasted every last morsel of Chow Mein in the country. His family and friends often wondered what had driven him to just get up and go. A postcard every month, sent to all he remembered (care of his parents) was all anyone ever knew of his continued existence.

It was a cold February morning the following year, when Jermaine returned to work. His manager, a puzzled look upon his face, couldn’t believe his eyes. His colleagues thought they were looking at a ghost. No word had reached them of Jermaine’s travels. Jermaine himself had never discussed a sabbatical or leave of absence.

He explained that he hadn’t died.
His manager explained they’d mourned him.
He explained, again, that he hadn’t died.
His manager explained he no longer had a job.

He returned home from work to find an eviction notice tacked to the door.


Written as part of a writing exercise for Today’s Author.


 

 

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Rob’s BBQ

Rob had often been accused of burning the candle at both ends. The truth was, Rob just liked burning things, period. His late night excursions, often disguised as business meetings, football with the boys or team away days always resulted in his hands smelling of petrol and his clothes reeking of smoke.

His wife didn’t mind.

She was happy of the time alone.

It gave her time to have a natter with friends on the phone, catch up with her soaps, marinate some meat, complete a puzzle or, like tonight, dispose of the charred bodies that just kept building up.

 

 

melting-wax-renee-heath

 

Submitted for Friday Fictioneers photo prompt. See if you can write a piece of flash fiction in 100 words.

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A leek and a potato

I’ve been a bit slack with the whole “cooking new things from books I’ve not read thing“. It’s mainly down to a lack of time at the moment, or budget, or both. It’s certainly not from a lack of effort. Honest guv. 

This week I did however manager to do something midweek which answered all the questions. 
Budget: Using ingredients that were leftover.
Time: Half hour
Newness: Never made it before and was found in Jamie’s Ministry of Food.

So whilst Leek and Potato soup doesn’t sound that exciting or new, it certainly ticked all the boxes for me this week. I must admit, it didn’t taste like any leek and potato soup I’d ever had before, but that wasn’t to say it tasted bad; just… different. Served up with a hunk of tiger (giraffe) bread and butter it proved to be a rather nomlicious exercise in that art of soup making and perfect for a cold, grey evening in November. 

I think there may well be something to this soup making lark. I’ll have to peruse the books and keep my eyes open for other leftovers that I can blitz into something new and dare I say it, exciting.

Image

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Food challenge: empire chicken and mince beef Wellington

Last week I began my food challenge with Empire Chicken, from Jamie’s Great Britain book. It had lots of potential, roast chicken with an Indian marijnade, Bombay potatoes and a curry sauce made from the juice of the chicken.

It almost worked, but not quite. The chicken was moist, the Bombay potatoes lovingly spiced but the gravy, for me the bit of the dish I was most looking forward to, just failed to deliver. Almost all of the pint of stock had evaporated and as such I was left to improvise.

I ended up with a curried gravy, but not the chicken stock thick sauce I was excited to taste. The whole thing has potential, I’ll have to figure out what went wrong and try again another time.

This week we revisit another Jamie Oliver book, this time Ministry of Food. Flicking through on Sunday morning in a somewhat slightly hungover state, I was keen to find something that wouldn’t stretch me too far yet still come under the banner of something I’ve not tried to make before.
I landed on a page entitled Minced Beef Wellington. Bingo.

I’ve been planning on making something like this before and if you’ve not tried to put this together yourself I really think you should give it a whirl. It takes an hour to cook, and roughly half hour prep and makes an interesting change to the usual mince recipes you have, week in week out!
With carrots, potato, peas and celery all wrapped up in crisp puff pastry it’s a little bit like biting into a Cornish pasty. Yum!

The book recommend serving with greens or mash potato, but instead I decided to put together some creamed leeks which complimented the star of the show perfectly.

As a bonus there is plenty leftover for tomorrow’s lunch. Huzzah!

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